6 Views

Doctors, others face jail terms for trading pain killers for sex, cash

About 60 medical professionals, including 31 doctors, seven pharmacists, eight nurses and seven other licensed medical professionals were on Wednesday charged with participating in the illegal prescribing of pain relievers in exchange for sex and cash.

The charges involve more than 350,000 illegal prescriptions written in Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Alabama and West Virginia, according to indictments unsealed in federal court in Cincinnati.

The charges include unlawful distribution or dispensing of controlled substances by a medical professional and health-care fraud. Each count carries a maximum 20-year prison sentence, and many of the defendants face multiple counts. At least one doctor is charged in connection with a death caused by the opioids, officials said.

The opioid indictments come as more than 1,500 cities, counties, Native American tribes and unions are suing drug companies in one of the largest and most complicated civil cases in American history.

In a number of cases, according to the indictments, doctors across the region traded prescriptions for oxycodone and hydrocodone for sexual favors. Some physicians instructed their patients to fill multiple prescriptions at different pharmacies. Prosecutors also documented how patients traveled to multiple states to see different doctors so they could collect and then fill numerous prescriptions.

ALSO SEE: 7 die, 12 children, others injured in Kwara auto crash

A federal judge in Cleveland is overseeing the cases, which accuse some of the biggest names in the industry of fueling the opioid epidemic. The companies have blamed the epidemic on corrupt doctors and pain management clinics and say the epidemic is too complicated to attribute to their actions.

Brian Benczkowski, an assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department’s criminal division, said he created the Appalachian Regional Prescription Opioid Strike Force late last year to target the region, which has been devastated by the epidemic.

The department analyzed several databases to identify suspicious prescribing activity and sent 14 prosecutors to 11 federal districts there.

“The opioid epidemic is the deadliest drug crisis in American history, and Appalachia has suffered the consequences more than perhaps any other region,” Attorney General William P. Barr said in a statement.

Once they had the data indicating suspicious prescriptions, investigators used confidential informants and undercover agents to infiltrate medical offices across the region. Cameras and tape recorders were rolling as they documented how medical professionals used their licenses to peddle highly addictive opioids in exchange for cash and sex, officials said.

Post Views: 43

You may be interested

Tinubu takes election battle to Makkah
Headlines
1 views
Headlines
1 views

Tinubu takes election battle to Makkah

Webby - May 20, 2019

The national leader of the All Progressives Congress has ripped into opposition Peoples Democratic Party, describing it as‘saucy, distractive, and…

Breaking: Nigerian coach slumps, dies after brief illness
Headlines
Headlines

Breaking: Nigerian coach slumps, dies after brief illness

Ademola Yakubu - May 20, 2019

Solomon Ogbeide, head coach of Lobi Stars football club, has reportedly passed away in the morning of Monday, May 20,…

9 days to inauguration of his second term, Buhari meets Tinubu in Makkah
Headlines
Headlines

9 days to inauguration of his second term, Buhari meets Tinubu in Makkah

Ademola Yakubu - May 20, 2019

- President Buhari on Monday, May 20, met with the national leader of APC, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu- Buhari is currently…

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.